Portrait Vera AllmanritterVera Allmanritter

Vera Allmanritter is currently working as a scientific project manager for the "Non-visitors-research-project" which is conducted by the Institute for Museum research Berlin in cooperation with visitBerlin and financed by the Senate Department for Culture and Europe, Berlin (Germany). Prior to this, she was research fellow at the Department of Cultural Policy at the University of Hildesheim and at the Jewish Museum Berlin as well as coordinator of the Center for Audience Development at the Free University of Berlin. She is recognized for her research, publications and teaching in the fields of cultural management, cultural marketing, visitor research, audience development, and empirical research methods.

Abstract:

Lifestyles among visitors of cultural institutions –
basic research for cultural management, cultural policy and cultural institutions


It is well known within cultural management research that the ongoing shift from a society of social classes to a society of different lifestyles in Germany has caused a declining explanatory force of sociodemographic factors concerning cultural institutions’ (potential) visitor`s behaviour. Still, depending on the underlying understanding of the term, the existence of diversity among visitors of cultural institutions is usually measured by their sociodemographic composition. This is not surprising, considering that the instruments designed for the measurement of lifestyles usually use a highly complex analysis method. In a pilot project financed by the German Federal Commission for Culture and Media a shortened survey instrument by sociologist Gunnar Otte was tested in a large-scale visitor survey. This presentation will provide insights into the theoretical approach of his instrument, first results of its application in visitor studies as well as implications of the study for cultural management research and practice.

 


 

Portrait Michael AnnoffMichael Annoff
Potsdam University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Michael Annoff is a cultural anthropologist by training. After his graduation he supported the founding process of the artistic graduate school at Berlin University of the Arts. Since then, he has lectured regularly at its Studium Generale program. Since 2016, he works as Academic Associate in the „Kulturarbeit“ Bachelor program at Potsdam University of Applied Sciences. As a freelance d curator, he has organized several conferences and festivals. Recently, he has been working on a project on immaterial cultural heritage of the post-migrant society, in cooperation with FHXB-Museum and his co-curator Nuray Demir.

Abstract:

Unequal Insiders. An ethnographic perspective on diversity work and urban citizenship

Recently, debates on ‚citizenship’ as a network of diverse practices that manifest beyond institutional figuration have been adapted within the arts to renew institutions as participatory platforms. Accordingly, new management and policy strategies in the arts refer to urban citizenship, like the recently set up diversity management projects of Kulturprojekte Berlin and Kulturstiftung des Bundes. They try to adjust programs, audiences and employee structures according to the institutions’ post-migrant urban environments.
My ethnographic perspective mixes methods of institutional and biographical research on the recent professionalisation of diversity managers: Although reference to urban citizenship might increase access opportunities, both diversity practitioners and theorists argue that their efforts tend to be recuperated by the employing institutions. Recent conflicts might evolve not only from unequally distributed privileges but also from asymmetrical professional experience.

 


 

Portrait Gesa BirnkrautGesa Birnkraut
University of applied sciences Osnabrück, Germany


Prof. Dr. Gesa Birnkraut holds a diploma in business administration and arts management. Her PhD was on the topic: “Volunteering in arts institutions in a comparison between the US and Germany”. She is a professor for strategic management at the University of applied sciences Osnabrück at the Master for Non Profit Management. She is also the general manager of the arts management consultancy Birnkraut|Partner arts+business consultants and head of the board of the non profit Institut fuer Kulturkonzepte. More information under www.birnkraut-partner.de or www.kulturkonzepte.de

Abstract: together with Sue Kay
Time to change the tune? Cultural volunteering as cultural participation


Anyone who is a cultural volunteer will have a good idea of why they do it and what they value about it. Anyone who has managed cultural volunteers will have an experiential understanding of the benefits and challenges of working with them. And those who have studied cultural volunteering contribute valuable theoretical insights in respect of both the above. Yet it is arguably still the case that – regardless of the different contexts and traditions in which cultural volunteering takes place ­– the default setting is that cultural volunteers are primarily a ‘resource’ to be ‘used’ whether they serve on a board or take part in day to day operations. Our concern is that this emphasis obscures the power of cultural volunteering as a discrete and legitimate form of participation in culture. This interactive workshop is an invitation to put our heads together, share our experiences and explore where some serious paradigm shifting might take us!

 


 

Portrait Pamela M. BartarPamela Bartar
Zentrum für soziale Innovation (ZSI); Universität für Angewandte Kunst, Wien, Österreich 


Pamela M. Bartar works in practice and practice-based research with a focus on science communication, knowledge transfer, citizen science, and participatory approaches in research and the arts. She was lecturer at the University of Vienna, and also teaches at the “Kinder University,” a special summer program for children. Before Pamela studied at the IKM, University of Music and Performing Arts. She is currently working on her doctoral thesis at the University of Applied Arts Vienna.


Abstract: together with Julia Poscharnig
Re-modeling impulses for social inclusion in artistic research:
A workshop


Values of “the arts” are diverse and invariably grounded in social experience. Value-for-Society is a frequent discussed term in the academic research and contemporary art. The social per se attracts interest from funders, academics and artists who want to use their creative skills for the benefit of communities and to address social, economic or political issues. The workshop aims on the one hand to discuss the potentials, limits and possible outputs of artistic research demonstrating the value of sensual engagements within learning and on the other hand requests artistic responsibility and social accountability within artistic citizenship. By hypothesizing and re-framing the research and education project “Textiles as a Social Fabric” (by researcher Ruth Mateus-Berr 2015) a discussion forum will be opened up to take steps towards a theoretical framework of socially engaged artistic research and design and good practice models. After a short introduction on the project, methodology and findings, the workshop will invite participants to further track questions “behind” disciplinary borders; they will be invited to contribute to a critical snapshot corresponding to the opening question of democratic pedagogy in the arts. The workshop combines the text-based World Café concept with other tactile and visual elements, including a sensual approach producing complementary codes instead of a monolingual approach in education. The workshop is designed as an interactive process and work in progress therefore the output of the workshop will be collected and then provided online (https://epilogueonsocialvalue.wordpress.com) for further discussion in the community to ensure enhancements through discussion. The website already provides material - recording and discussion - from our workshop in May 2018 (conference: Teaching artistic research, Vienna) on which the present workshop is based. The website is an integral part of the workshop. It is designed as a platform to collect, exchange, discuss and evaluate issues and further questions that are being raised during the workshop.

 


 

Portrait Charlotte BurghardtCharlotte Burghardt

Charlotte Burghardt (*1990 in Correggio/Italy) is a Ph.D. student/research associate at the Department for Cultural Policy, University of Hildesheim.

After finishing her Bachelor Studies in dramatics and political science at the University of Leipzig she graduated in Cultural Management from the Academy for Music and Theatre Hamburg in 2017. Since 2018 she is a member of a research project for the German Research Association (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG) about the structural change of cultural request regarding Public Theatres in German society. Her current dissertation research broaches the issue of diversity and intercultural opening in Public Theatres in Germany.

Abstract: together with Birgit Mandel
Migration as main trigger for change management in German public theatres? Results of a research project on the institutional crisis of public theatres?


German public theatres are under pressure to prove their relevance due to current discourses on challenged and chances of diversity and the role of arts institutions in an increasingly diverse society. How far is the diversity of the German population reflected in the audience, the programs and the staff of public theatres? Visitor surveys show that the audiences still consist of a small group with mainly higher education and German or Western European background. An analysis of the programs of drama theatres in Germany shows that the repertoire is dominated by canon of Western authors and directors.Results of an analysis of the Maxim Gorki theatre in Berlin, the first public German theatre with an explicit mission for diversity, indicate that a policy to promote diversity in programming and staff influences the composition of the audience as well as organizational changes.

 


 

Portrait Ana ČorićAna Čorić

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and Academy of Music, University of Zagreb, Croatia. Ana Čorić (Rijeka, 1988) is an assistant at the Music Education Department, Academy of Music, University of Zagreb, where she graduated in 2012., after finishing her bachelor studies in Music Department of Juraj Dobrila University of Pula. Now she is a PhD student in Education at Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb. Her special artistic and educational interests and fields of research are artistic citizenship and  citizenship education, professional identity, university civic (third) mission, community music, group music activities, interdisciplinary approach in music education and yputh studies. As a musician she has a long experience as a choir singer and conductor. From 2015 her focus in on ethno camps for youth and making world music with vocal groups. She collaborates with the Croatian National Television where she does tv programes for children, teachers and parents.

Abstract:
From Artistic Citizenship to the Civic Mission of Music Academy: Croatian Perspective


Being a musician in contemporary society means making move from concert halls and other cultural and educational institutions towards the community. Now more than ever there should not be a border between artistic excellence and social consciousness (Polisi, 2016). An active engagement in the society through reflective artistic practice forms a specific kind of citizenship – an artistic citizenship. The term refers to: (I) ethical way of living, making and teaching music that aims at having a lifelong artistic engagement and personal fulfilment; (II) broadening a musician’s perspective to include his/her engagement in the community (new approach to the audience); (III) new mental and emotional framework that regulates an artist’s way of seeing, thinking, listening, making connections and questioning things (expansion of awareness for new needs); (IV) a wider focus of musician’s education; (V) a wider context of music education and performance (hospitals, prisons, streets, etc.); (VI) music education as reflective practice and (VII) music universities as places of a musician’s personal and civic development  (Schmidt-Campbell and Martin, 2006; Elliott, 2015; Elliott, Silverman and Bowman, 2016; Polisi, 2016). Successful development of the concept depends on the preparation of professionals, which is the reason why artistic citizenship should be made a part of the university curricula and lifelong professional training. Integrating artistic citizenship education in the higher education system can be done in different ways depending on the university itself. A formal model called university civic mission “articulates a system of values and principles that directs fundamental university services and different activities of teachers and students in service-based learning, that lead to education of socially responsible and active citizens, civil society development, democracy and life quality improvement in the community” (Ćulum and Ledić, 2011:53). In reference to a higher education music system, the music academy civic mission means connecting music to the community through artistic, educational and scientific programs and partnerships between the academy and NGO-s, hosiptals, prisons, homes for children, refugee camps, etc. Academy’s civic mission is a response to the directions given by the UNESCO’s reccomendations for arts education in 21st century (UNESCO, 2006 and 2010), as well as by the World Declaration on Higher Education (UNESCO, 1998). Relying on qualitative methodology, the paper presents results of research conducted at the Croatian academies of music. The interviews with senior staff of the institutions indicate at potentials for developing artistic citizenship competences and academy’s civic mission in the Croatian higher education system.
 

 


 

Portrait Will F. Garrett-PettsWill F. Garrett-Petts
Thompson Rivers University

Will Garrett-Petts is Professor and Associate Vice-President of Research and Graduate Studies at Thompson Rivers University. He is former Research Director of a humanities-led national research program exploring the cultural future of smaller communities. His recent books include Cultural Mapping as Cultural Inquiry (Routledge 2015); Whose Culture is it, Anyway? Community Engagement in Small Cities (New Star Books 2014); Writing about Literature (Broadview Press 2013); Imaging Place (Textual Studies in Canada 2008); Artists’ Statements and the Nature of Artistic Inquiry (Open Letter 2007); The Small Cities Book: On the Cultural Future of Small Cities (New Star Books 2005); and PhotoGraphic Encounters: The Edges and Edginess of Reading Prose Pictures and Visual Fictions (University of Alberta Press 2000). His most recent book is Artistic Approaches to Cultural Mapping: Activating Imaginaries and Ways of Knowing (Routledge 2018), co-edited with Nancy Duxbury and Alys Longley. He is currently engaged in exploring questions of artist-led research, cultural and vernacular mapping, and the artistic animation of small cities.

Abstract: together with Sharon Karsten

Artist-led cultural mapping: a catalyst for the re-imagination, and re-formation, of municipal power hierarchies

Alongside the municipal cultural mapping movement, a growing number of arts-based researchers and community developers have been working to explore the dimensionality and potentials of place and community—through forms of cultural mapping rooted in creative practice (Duxbury, Garrett-Petts, et al, 2019). As Novak-Leonard and Skaggs (2017) note, “there is a hypothesis stemming from within the arts and cultural field that a policy paradigm focused on artists’ roles in community change, development, and placemaking is taking hold.”  While not without their own biases, forms of creative cartography are seen by many to do a better job than dominant municipal cultural mapping practices in uncovering the intangible dimensions of place, including the emotions, sensations and relationships that inform and comprise the life-world—what Raymond Williams calls “structures of feeling” (1973.) By tapping into these structures, arts-based cultural mapping “animat[es] and honor[s] the local, by giving voice and definition to the vernacular” (Duxbury, Garrett-Petts, et al, 2019).

 


 

Portrait Lisa GauppLisa Gaupp
Leuphana University of Lueneburg, Institute of Sociology and Cultural Organization, Germany

Lisa Gaupp studied cultural studies, intercultural & international studies and ethnomusicology at the universities of Lüneburg, Barcelona and Hanover as a fellow of the German National Academic Foundation. Her doctoral thesis focuses on mechanism of “othering” in “intercultural” policies in the field of popular music (Open Access: https://www.uni-hildesheim.de/bibliothek/publizieren/open-access-universitaetsverlag/verlagsprogramm/center-for-world-music-studies-in-music/band-1/).
In her postdoc research she analyzes curatorial strategies regarding cultural diversity at transnational Performing Arts and music festivals. Lisa Gaupp lived in the USA, Haiti, Guatemala and Spain and was the Executive Manager of the 2009 Hannover International Violin Competition (Stiftung Niedersachsen). http://www.leuphana.de/en/university/staff-members/lisa-gaupp.html

Abstract:

Beyond Diversity – The Politics of Global Music Cultures

The paper analyzes the politics of diversity in global music cultures. Diversity issues have become one of the key issues in the economy, in public life and in governance – in particular in the cultural field. However, the more diversity becomes present and visible, the more it appears to be regulated, policed, and standardized in various ways and with different purposes, ranging from political debates about the “limits of tolerance” up to stereotyped forms of cultural hybridity in fashion or advertisements as well as in arts management and its educational fields.
One of the most urgent tasks in arts management today is the deconstruction of such exotic representations, othering processes and established Eurocentric political and educational concepts. It is crucial to address the continuing biases and assumptions underlying arts management education as well as arts programming – not only show how the arts serve politics, but to explore possibilities to avoid these othering processes.

In order to do so, some examples as to how diversity is standardized in narratives taking place in public debates and in academic discourse as well as in festival curating processes will be unraveled. For example, in the area of „intersectional diversity“, music festivals will be presented that follow the goal of creating a more inclusive environment. Many music festivals are organized by politically active or at least engaged organizations which are now trying to achieve, for example, a gender balance within their artists’ roster. Moreover, in the field of „diversity in the arts“, the goal is to increase the visibility of  artistic diversity, also on a global level. Last but not least, the narrative area “mediating diversity” has the same goal but on the level of the audiences. The audiences attending art performances should become more diverse.

As such, the notions of politics and domination are at the center of these practices. Power is established and de-established by assigning differences, by controlling and sanctioning deviance, leading for example to standardization and thereby to the institutionalization of diversity. The paper will discuss how, by applying a transcultural perspective to diversity in arts management research and teaching as well as in practice, it is indeed possible to avoid the biases underlying education and curating processes.

 


 

Michael Habersam
University of Innsbruck, Department of Organisation & Learning, Austria

Born 1965, Vienna, Austria; in 1996 PhD (Controllíng as Evaluation) at Private University Witten/Herdecke, Germany; Habilitation (Management of Public Hospitals) 2008 at University of Innsbruck, Faculty of Business and Management
Research:

Evaluation of organizational performance and impact in the fields of Arts & Culture and Higher Education
General business administration-/management-theory, focusing on ontological, epistemological, and methodological aspects of theory-building
Teaching in BA, MA and PhD courses; Program Director, Bachelor Program Management & Economics
Latest publication: Habersam, M., Piber, M. and Skoog, M. (2018) "Ten years of using knowledge balance sheets in Austrian public universities: A retrospective and prospective view", Journal of Intellectual Capital, Vol. 19 (1), pp.34-52. [link].

Abstract: together with Martin Piber
The Evaluation of European Capitals of Culture: A Critical View on Evaluation Regimes, Citizenship and some Prolegomena to Future Evaluation Frameworks

This paper gives an extensive review of the past development and possible future directions of the evaluation framework for ECoC projects. An analysis of the methodological and epistemological assumptions of goal-setting processes, performance measurement instruments, and evaluation procedures sheds light on the influence of evaluative practices on the implementation of ECOC-projects. We also pose the question, how long-term-effects can be addressed and evaluated adequately. In terms of further developments, we will especially analyse to what extent the obligation for all ECoCs to evaluate themselves supports diversity, and if a systematic use of visualizations and narratives can contribute and complement or even partly replace existing evaluative frameworks. The results will allow to estimate to what extent evaluative action can assess success, what evaluation and monitoring frameworks contribute to what evaluation targets and what conclusions we can draw for future ECoC projects.

 


 

Portrait Raphaela HenzeRaphaela Henze
Heilbronn University, Germany
Arts Management Professor specialisation in Globalization and Internationalisation

Raphaela Henze is professor of Arts Management at Heilbronn University in Germany and Co-Investigator of the Arts & Humanities Research Council funded, international and interdisciplinary network Brokering Intercultural Exchange (www.managingculture.net). Prior to joining Heilbronn University, Raphaela Henze worked in several senior management positions in universities, ministries, and non-profit organisations. Her main research focus is on the impacts of globalization and internationalization on arts management and arts management education as well as on the role of arts and culture in times of raising populism. She has published widely on these topics and has been a speaker at numerous international conferences.

Raphaela Henze, studied law at Humboldt-University Berlin and Paris X-Nanterre in France, received her Ph.D. from Ruhr University Bochum, was a postdoc in the Law, Media & Culture Project at Yale Law School, USA, as well as at the National Institute for Educational Policy Research (NIER) in Tokyo, Japan. She holds an MBA from the University of London.

Abstract:

The master’s tool will never dismantle the master’s house

Keywords: language, terminology and narratives, inequalities, espistemicide
This paper is about power mechanisms inherent in our (knowledge) system, particularly focusing on the language we use in arts management practice. The discussion presented will explore language in two ways: as regards one’s native tongue in which arts management practice is conducted as well as the terminology of the profession (especially the one used in international contexts).
The paper reflects on the learning Victoria Durrer from Queen’s University Belfast and I gained in building the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded international and interdisciplinary research network Brokering Intercultural Exchange (www.managingculture.net) over the last two and a half years. In doing so, the paper strives to identify the blind spots and fault lines particularly in our methodologies of participation. Based on the works by Spivak, Hall, Bloch, Butler, Jullien, de Sousa Santos, and Williams this shall be the beginning of a longer process of a) trying to overcome inequalities and misunderstandings when it comes to language and terminology in our discipline and b) involving new narratives of those we came to call “hidden voices”, who have been absent from our “Western” discourses for too long.
The paper is based on a thorough review of the literature and narratives used particularly in European arts management as well as on empirical research that involved arts management researchers from several different countries among them China, Taiwan, Singapore, France, Germany, the Netherlands, UK, Denmark, Finland, Spain, Malta, Turkey, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Solvenia, Australia, Columbia, Brazil, Argentina, Puerto Rico, USA, Canada, Lebanon, and India . They all contributed their definitions of some of the most frequently used terms in current (international) arts management debates e.g. ‘inclusive society’, ‘community engagement’, and ‘equality’.

 


 

Portrait Christian HolstChristian Holst
Zurich University of Arts, Cast/Audiovisual Media, Switzerland
Lecturer and Researcher

Christian Holst is a lecturer and researcher at the Zurich University of the Arts, subject area Cast/Audiovisual Media. He also teaches digital cultural communication as a lecturer at various universities, e.g. Leuphana University Lüneburg and HAW Hamburg. He previously worked at the Zurich Opera House and the Oldenburg State Theatre. Holst is co-founder and board member of stARTconference.

Abstract:
Cultural branding and Co-Creation

Digitalisation has multiplied the possibilities of cultural negotiation processes and thus made more people cultural actors and competent co-designers of cultural brands. For cultural institutions, this means that the sovereignty to interpret their own brand presentation is diminished. Brands become object of unauthorized appropriation and representation by third parties. From the point of view of the institutions, the question therefore arises how the variety of representations of  their offer can be stimulated in their interest and a contoured (brand) profile can be created.

The lecture presents the concept of co-creation as a possible answer to this development. In this concept, the public is not understood as a passive addressee of cultural branding, offers and the associated services. The public is rather seen as a competent co-creator and partner, who confidently claims to participate in cultural negotiation processes.

 


 

Portrait Sharon KarstenSharon Karsten
Simon Fraser University
Director, Comox Valley Art Gallery

Sharon Karsten is a Ph.D student/researcher, community developer and civic activist. Her current dissertation research through Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada) explores the role of art institutions in enacting and/or constraining transformative social-democratic potentials within small city contexts. This line of inquiry is carried-over into Sharon’s work as a cultural manager – currently she serves as Director of Comox Valley Art Gallery, a non-profit, contemporary, small city art institute through which she has initiated numerous citizenship and community activation projects. Sharon brings over 20 years of cultural management and community development experience to her quest to enact rooted and sustainable forms of arts-based transformation.

Abstract:
together with Will Garrett-Petts
Artist-led cultural mapping: a catalyst for the re-imagination, and re-formation, of municipal power hierarchies

Alongside the municipal cultural mapping movement, a growing number of arts-based researchers and community developers have been working to explore the dimensionality and potentials of place and community—through forms of cultural mapping rooted in creative practice (Duxbury, Garrett-Petts, et al, 2019). As Novak-Leonard and Skaggs (2017) note, “there is a hypothesis stemming from within the arts and cultural field that a policy paradigm focused on artists’ roles in community change, development, and placemaking is taking hold.”  While not without their own biases, forms of creative cartography are seen by many to do a better job than dominant municipal cultural mapping practices in uncovering the intangible dimensions of place, including the emotions, sensations and relationships that inform and comprise the life-world—what Raymond Williams calls “structures of feeling” (1973.) By tapping into these structures, arts-based cultural mapping “animat[es] and honor[s] the local, by giving voice and definition to the vernacular” (Duxbury, Garrett-Petts, et al, 2019).

 


 

Portrait Sue KaySue Kay
freelance, France/UK

Sue has a background in arts management and cultural administration. She has held senior management positions in three theatres, all of which had significant volunteer involvement – the last one having a volunteer force of 460. She has worked as a cultural planner (Arts Council England South West), subject director for arts management (Dartington College of Arts), and as executive director of the erstwhile regional cultural consortium for South West England. Since 2005 she has operated as a freelance consultant, educator and trainer. She has an MA in Cultural Management from City University and a PhD in Leadership Studies (focusing on cultural managers in micro-scale theatre organisations) from the University of Exeter. Now based in France, and formerly a board member of the European Network of Cultural Administration Training Centres, Sue works outside the UK on a regular basis in Central and Eastern Europe, Nordic Baltic countries and the Southern Mediterranean region.

Abstract: together with Gesa Birnkraut

Time to change the tune? Cultural volunteering as cultural participation

Anyone who is a cultural volunteer will have a good idea of why they do it and what they value about it. Anyone who has managed cultural volunteers will have an experiential understanding of the benefits and challenges of working with them. And those who have studied cultural volunteering contribute valuable theoretical insights in respect of both the above. Yet it is arguably still the case that – regardless of the different contexts and traditions in which cultural volunteering takes place ­– the default setting is that cultural volunteers are primarily a ‘resource’ to be ‘used’ whether they serve on a board or take part in day to day operations. Our concern is that this emphasis obscures the power of cultural volunteering as a discrete and legitimate form of participation in culture. This interactive workshop is an invitation to put our heads together, share our experiences and explore where some serious paradigm shifting might take us!

 


 

Portrait Natasha A. KellyNatasha A. Kelly

Natasha A. Kelly has a PhD in Communication Studies and Sociology from the University Münster. Born and bred in the United Kingdom and raised in Germany, she considers herself to be an »academic activist«, two important features that can be seen individually, but never separately from each other. Rooted in the Pan-African culture of her Jamaican heritage, her political and academic works relate to the past, present, and future of the African Diaspora in Germany. This is also the focus of her numerous art installations that have been shown in museums throughout Germany. Since 2015 Natasha’s annual performance »M(a)y Sister«, which is dedicated to the Afro-German poetess and activist May Ayim, has been shown at the HAU Theatre in Berlin. Her first documentary film »Milli’s Awakening« was screened at the 10th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art from June to September 2018 and received the Black Laurel Film Award as Best Documentary Feature in October 2018. For more information see: http://www.NatashaAKelly.com

Abstract:
Milli’s Awakening

In the works of many German Expressionists, Black women were merely portrayed as »objects of desire«. Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, for example, was less interested in exploring the anatomy of the female body. Rather, he wanted to feel his own manhood through the alleged »bondage to nature« of his motives. In 1911, at the height of German colonialism he painted »Sleeping Milli« naked on a couch. The only source of his inspiration was his male sense of eroticism. While numerous art historians take the aesthetics as well as the sexual fantasies of Kirchner in the focus, the documentary film »Milli’s Awakening« wants to immerse in the thought and emotions of his »muse« and let Milli awake figuratively: Black female artists of various generations, who have overcome the common colonial stereotypes and have formed their own self-determined identity as Black Women within the white German majority society report on their challenges in and with German art institutions, visual representation and political and social exclusion.

 


 

Portrait Volker KirchbergVolker Kirchberg
Institute of Sociology and Cultural Organization

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Leuphana University of Lüenburg, Germany
Professor of Sociology of the Arts

Volker Kirchberg is Professor for Sociology of the Arts at Leuphana University Lüneburg. His main research fields are empirical sociology of arts and culture, organizational sociology (arts institutions), cultural communication (outreach by museums) and urban sociology (and the arts). Apart from several administrative and research positions at the Leuphana Institute of Sociology and Cultural Organization, and the Leuphana Faculty for Humanities and Social Sciences, he has been board member or section head of several ESA and ISA research networks and head of the Association of Cultural Management (Fachverband Kulturmanagement). His special empirical interests are focused on interfaces of culture, cities and sustainability, museum visitor research, cultural consumption, network research, and effects of arts and artists on urban development.

Abstract:
together with Robert Peper

Power and Potential of Artistic and Cultural Organizations in a Sustainable Urban Development – a Network Analysis

Our paper presents the results of a network study on sustainable urban development with a special focus on the importance of local artistic and cultural initiatives and organizations. This study was conducted in the framework of the interdisciplinary research "City as Possibility Space", which took place from 2015 to 2018. From a network theoretical perspective, we postulated that artistic and cultural actors participate strongly in this network and influence the strength and orientation of the network.

Our premise is that networking is an important factor of a powerful sustainable urban development. First, we therefore examine whether this sustainable urban development is a result of relational structures. Second, we can identify individual agents or organizations as key players in such a network. Third, we can find out how significant networks are for the actors by analyzing the benefits of network participation between control (power) and identity (community). It is here that the potentials of quantitative and qualitative network analysis can be combined to better understand the benefits of networking.
The data for the quantitative network analysis was collected in 2017 by means of a standardized online survey among organizations and projects of sustainable urban development in Hanover. Actors became co-operating partners according to their relationship. Relations were further differentiated according to symmetric and asymmetric relations. In addition, the centrality of the actors in the network was surveyed and the existence of subnetworks was recorded. Basically, it can be stated that municipal administrative offices hold the most important positions in the network. The actors are more interconnected if they are bureaucratically institutionalized, and they are less well networked if they work flexibly as temporary projects and initiatives. While municipal institutions can have a controlling effect here, artistic-cultural organizations in particular relied on help from other actors in the network.

The quantitative network analysis of 156 (large network) and 56 (core and intensive network) actors of sustainable urban development in Hannover has produced a number of results, which were presented for discussion at a workshop with field actors in Hanover, many of them from brokerage organizations. An important topic of the discussion at the workshop was the importance of institutionalizing organizations and sustainable urban development projects. One group of the participating actors demanded more institutionalization and a mimesis with the conventions of urban bureaucracy because the power of non-institutionalized organizations of sustainable urban development rely on a secured access to the bureaucratic headquarters of the urban municipality. The argument of this group was the relatively weak position of most initiatives and organizations that do not have comprehensive institutional structures in the illustrated network. They display mostly outgoing relationships (high outdegree values), so they ask for resources from others. The highly or higher institutionalized organizations, on the other hand, have many in-depth relationships (high indegree values), so they are asked by others for resources. This imbalance can only be reduced by a stronger institutionalization of the civil society actors, which is, however, not easy to be realized. Our network analysis data show that voluntary and unpaid employment is less helpful for networking actors than institutions that work with paid employees. This is not only valid for the municipal government agencies, but also for educational institutions, businesses, and (high) cultural venues, which have significantly higher levels of indegree as the voluntarily working initiatives, be they NGOs, grassroots initiatives or arts and cultural initiatives.

The other group protested against this demand for permanently institutionalized structures within the network, having their own strong arguments. Firstly, the possibility for a constructive cooperation in the community should not be based on mechanisms of top-down power (such as the dependency on financial resources), cf. Giuffre (2013), Sennett (2012) or Blokland (2017). Exploitation by some powerful brokers in the network can be prevented if all participants in the network have a solid and yet informal culture, with clear rules and moral values of a common solidarity (Giuffre 2013). This code of the "public conduct" (Blokland 2017), of "polity conventions" (Sennett 1998) or of "identity" (White 2012) prevents the misuse of a network. In addition, some institutional actors can contribute to enhancing the efficiency and flexibility of networking, especially if autonomy matches creativity. A code of "public conduct" consists of the exchange of knowledge, solidarity, unifying support, a capacity for open negotiation, attentive listening, dialogue and a sustainable continuity of cooperation among the network actors.  Then, the network cannot be used for the preservation of established top-down power but for the bottom-up and participatory development of creativity and innovation for a multidimensional sustainable urban development. A precondition for the success of this power distributing and power balancing networking is the fully accepted rule that the public completely subordinates to this “public conduct"; a deviation from this would result in sanctions, in the extreme a removal from the network.

This controversy about the necessity or the avoidance of institutionalization between the two groups can be classified into the dichotomous categories of structural or agency-oriented interpretations of the network. This issue can also be discussed with a view on the 17 global UN goals for sustainable development. For example, the 10th goal of the UN Sustainable Development Goals is "reducing inequality," with subgoals such as empowerment and social, economic, and political inclusion, and the 16th goal is "peaceful and inclusive societies," with the sub-goal of need-based, inclusive , participatory and representative decision-making. While a structuralist perspective on strengthening a sustainable urban development network may be appropriate to the current social reality, most of the actors in the network prefer to have a collaborative-interactional perspective in line with these goals of sustainable development. The discussion among the workshop participants is reflected in the results of our quantitative network analysis since one can also speak of a structural or an agency oriented evaluation of the network results. On the one hand (structuralistic interpretation), dominance as a power monopoly is viewed critically, since a dependence on interface actors could be exploited. But for others (interactionist interpretation), the power of some actors in the network is seen as reversible, because, on the basis of Harrison White's concept of communal identity, a monopolistic exercise of power can be prevented by jointly agreed rules and values. Here, in particular, artistic-cultural organizations in the network are expected to convey a "public conduct" (Blokland) or "policy conventions" (Sennett) in the sense of an egalitarian network.

 



 

Portrait Irene KnavaIrene Knava
AUDIENCING, Österreich

Beratung – Training – Co-Kreation für Kulturbetriebe

Is an expert for
audience, cultural experience and cultural performance management. She is an organisational consulter, certificated quality manager, management trainer and lecturer at universities in Austria as well as in Germany. She studied Theatre, Film and Media Studies, History of Art, Business Administration and Cultural Management in Vienna and worked in management positions for various cultural establishments for 15 years. Since 2009, Irene Knava and her agency AUDIENCING offer consultation, training and provide support for visitors oriented cultural organisation. In the AUDIENCING Labs, Irene Knava develops innovative sample solutions in cooperation with the cultural sector. Her latest book ISO FOR CULTURE: Qualitätsmanagement für Kulturbetriebe was published by Facultas, Vienna. She is currently preparing her new work: AUDIENCING Reloaded!  www.audiencing.net

Abstract: 
Effective implementation of diversity and its evaluation over time
Cultural performance management as a new tool for cultural fields

For many cultural establishments, cultural diversity represents an important goal and is a challenge at the same time. The audience, the programme and the staff should present the composition of urban society. Institutions should thus be the reflection of the surrounding society. This means a process of change regarding the goals and structures of public cultural establishments, particularly for those, which have little experience in developing organisation and making changes. How can diversity in regard to the goals and the work structures of cultural establishment become introduced? How can it be evaluated over time and how can the definite changes be visualised?

During the lecture, the results of AUDIENCING Labs on the subject of Diversität im Publikum (Diversity in the audience) and Let’s Talk Diversity! (2017-2018, 130 participants) will be presented. In addition, the relation between the results and the concept of cultural performance management, which was co-creatively developed 2015 - 2018 by Irene Knava and 150 representatives of cultural establishments will be pointed out. 

 

 


 

Portrait Thomas KnubbenThomas Knubben
Institut für Kulturmanagement der Pädagogischen Hochschule Ludwigsburg

Kulturwissenschaftler, Leiter Master-Studiengang

Studium der Geschichte, Germanistik und Empirischen Kulturwissenschaft in Tübingen und Bordeaux; Promotion an der Universität Essen. 1985 - 2002 leitende Funktion im kommunalen Kulturmanagement, seit 2003 Professor für Kulturwissenschaft und Kulturmanagement am Institut für Kulturmanagement der Pädagogischen Hochschule Ludwigsburg und Leiter des Masterstudiengangs.
Zahlreiche Veröffentlichungen im Spannungsfeld von Kulturgeschichte, Kunst und Kulturmanagement, darunter Essays und Kataloge zu Paul Klee (1995), Wols (1997), Joseph Beuys (1998), Emil Nolde (1999), Andy Warhol (2000), Otto Dix (2002), Marlene Dumas (2003) und Auguste Rodin (2005); kulturgeschichtliche Monografien: Hölderlin. Eine Winterreise, Tübingen 2011; Mesmer oder die Erkundung der dunklen Seite des Mondes, Tübingen 2015; sowie Studien und Publikationen zu kulturmanagerialen Fragestellungen: Zukunft für Musikschulen, Bielefeld 2007 (mit Petra Schneidewind);  United in Diversity? Cultural Policy and its Dimensions, Ludwigsburg 2011 (Ed. u.a.);   Sharing Diversity. Culture as a Resource for Future Europe and its Dimensions in four European Countries: Bulgaria, Finland, Germany and Poland, Helsinki 2013 (Ed. u.a.); zuletzt: Weltkulturatlas. Kultur in Zeiten der Globalisierung, Stuttgart 2019 (Hg. mit Erich Schöls und Uli Braun).

Abstract:

Genossenschaften galten angesichts ihrer Entstehungszusammenhänge immer als „Kinder der Not“

Im Jahr 2016 wurde „die Idee und Praxis, gemeinsame Interessen in Genossenschaften zu organisieren“ in die UNESCO Repräsentativliste des Immateriellen Weltkulturerbes aufgenommen. Damit fand eine sozio-ökonomische Organisationsform ihre offizielle kulturelle Anerkennung, die in ihrer modernen Erscheinungsform angesichts der Spannungslagen im Transformationsprozess vom feudalen Zeitalter in die industrielle Gesellschaft erfunden wurde. Schon zuvor hatte die UN der Genossenschaftsbewegung die Referenz erwiesen und das Jahr 2012 zum „International Year of Cooperatives“ erklärt. Dass diese Anerkennung zu diesem Zeitpunkt erfolgte, hängt damit zusammen, dass die Genossenschaftsbewegung nach einer längeren Phase der Stagnation seit wenigen Jahren einen neuen Aufschwung erfährt und ihre Geschäftsfelder in Wirtschaftssektoren ausgedehnt hat, die traditionell nicht zu ihrem angestammten Aktionsbereich gehören. Dazu zählen auch die Kulturgenossenschaften. Ermöglicht wurde die Erweiterung des Handlungsraums für Kooperativen auf europäischer Ebene durch die Schaffung der Rechtsform der Societas Cooperativa Europea und auf nationaler deutscher Ebene durch die Novellierung des Genossenschaftsrechts 2006.
Genossenschaften galten angesichts ihrer Entstehungszusammenhänge immer als „Kinder der Not“.
Auch die derzeit knapp 100 Genossenschaften in Deutschland, die im engeren oder weiteren Sinne dem kulturellen Sektor zugeordnet werden können, verdanken ihre Gründung großenteils defizitären Umständen wie der drohenden Schließung von Kultureinrichtungen oder dem Mangel an kultureller Infrastruktur und der daraus erwachsenen Notwendigkeit direkten solidarischen Handelns in Eigenverantwortung.  Zugleich stellt sich jedoch die Frage, ob die Organisationsform der Genossenschaft aufgrund ihres Selbstverständnisses und ihrer strukturellen Anlage, wirtschaftliche Orientierung mit gemeinwesenorientierten Förderzwecken zu verbinden, neue und nachhaltige Potentiale in der Gestaltung aktueller (kultur-)politischer Transformationsprozesse bietet.
Die Präsentation geht dieser Frage auf der Basis eines Mappings von Kulturgenossenschaften in Deutschland vor dem Hintergrund entsprechender europäischer Entwicklungen nach und diskutiert anhand von Fallanalysen Potenziale und Grenzen des Ansatzes im Hinblick auf die Forderungen nach erweiterter Partizipation breiterer Bevölkerungskreise, nach Stärkung der Diversität der Beteiligten und nach neuen demokratischen und transparenten Formen der Governance kultureller und kulturpolitischer Prozesse.

 



 

Portrait Tamara KomatovićTamara Komatović
University of Belgrade

Faculty of Political Sciences, Serbia

Having been studying music since the age of five, she has obtained two BA degrees – one in Music theory, from Faculty of Music in Belgrade, and the other in Violin performance, from Academy of Arts in Novi Sad.

Currently pursuing two MA degrees – in Music theory at Faculty of Music in Belgrade, focusing on contemporary music, with an interest in psychoacoustics, and the second one in Culturology, at Faculty of Political Sciences in Belgrade, focusing on ideas of utopia and dystopia in postmodern society.
In the past four years she has been playing violin in several renown traditional music ensembles, which sparked her interest in traditional and World music as a research topic. Particularly interested in a relationship between music and identity, as well as how popular culture can be used to construct (or deconstruct) identities and therefore manipulate our perception.

Fluent in Serbian and English, with intermediate knowledge of German and French.

Abstract:

World Music - Bridging the Gap or Diminishing Diversity?

What is the relationship between music and identity? When does cultural exchange become cultural appropriation? Where is the line between borrowing and hybridization? Is world music still a bridge between local and global, or did it become a mass consumption product deprived of authenticity?
These are just some of the questions we will tackle in this presentation, well aware that there might not be definitive answers yet. Nevertheless, we find it important to start a discussion on these topics, especially with growing popularity of world music in recent years.

Finally, we will try to draw conclusions about what can cultural workers (be it performers, producers or managers) do to maintain, develop or even renew certain music practices in contemporary society. By doing so, we could preserve cultural diversity, which might otherwise be endangered by advancing globalization.

 


 

Portrait Annette LösekeAnnette Löseke
Lecturer Museum Studies, New York, University Berlin

Dr Annette Loeseke is Lecturer in Museum Studies and Lecturer Representative for Equity Diversity and Inclusion at New York University in Berlin. In January 2019 she is a Senior Visiting Fellow at University College London in Qatar. From June through August 2015 she was a Scholar-in-Residence at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. Her research interests include postcolonial museum studies, curatorial ecologies, empirical visitor studies and cultural activism. She co-organized the conference Rethinking Museums Politically at Technical University Berlin in May 2017 and the panel discussion Decolonize Mitte! Humboldt Forum, Museum Island and the Schloss at NYU Berlin in November 2018. Recent publications include the book chapters Experimental Exhibition Models (in Suzanne MacLeod et al, The Future of Museum and Gallery Design, Routledge 2018), Transhistoricism. Using the Past to Critique the Present (in Simon Knell, The Contemporary Museum, Routledge 2018) and Studying International Visitors at Shanghai Museum (in Caroline Lang/John Reeve, New Museum Practice in Asia, London 2018).Abstract:

Abstract:
Expanding Empirical Research in Politically Controversial Times: From Audiences to Stakeholders to Citizens


By discussing the current right-wing backlash in many countries, this paper explores implications for empirical research and strategy building, and asks how museums might become agents of change in politically controversial times. In order to stir debate, the paper explores the hypothesis that the focus of audience research and participation and outreach programmes in the cultural sector has so far been too narrow in two main respects: 1) the focus on arts organisations and arts- related experiences (as opposed to values and political opinions); and 2) the focus on audiences (as opposed to stakeholders).
ad 1) Building on recent literature (e.g. Witcomb, Xenophobia: Museums, refugees and fear of the other, in Knell 2018), museum directors and managers need to reconsider their (potential) audiences as citizens, and reach out to those audiences that, for example, sympathise with current populist movements. Hence, museum managers need to rethink segmentation models, identify segmentation strategies that correspond with values that shape political opinions, and redefine their target groups.

ad 2) Empirical researchers need to expand the current focus on audiences (whether as visitors or users or participants). Not only do empirical researchers need to find out more about audiences' motivations; research is also needed to analyze potentially controversial motivations and values by a broader range of stakeholders. These might include left- or right-wing political activists; politically centrist audiences that might be concerned or worried by current controversial debates about 'diversity' and 'identity'; museum staff that might need to redefine their professional roles; and private donors and influential members of friend schemes.
Hence, in addition to well-established segmentation models such as demographic models, lifestyle groupings or experience-related categories (e.g. Falk 2009), empirical researchers in the cultural sector need to adopt research methods and approaches as applied, for example, in the political sector. Research is urgently needed to analyse political opinions, identity-related values and emotions about controversially debated topics such as diversity, equity, inclusion and participation, as well as gender and race or ethnicity-related issues. Rather than new research methods, the paper suggests to refocus research and learn from neighbouring disciplines such as political sciences.
Drawing on Elaine Heumann Gurian (On the Importance of And, in MacLeod et al 2018) and Isolde Charim's notions of plurality, insecurity and 'deregulated' space (Ich und die Anderen, 2018), museum managers further need to reconsider what sort of public space museums might produce and provide. How could museums develop a progressive political agenda while at the same time consider a wide range of values and address progressive as well as centrist or conservative audiences? How could we reconsider the role and civic responsibility of private funders? How might private funders respond if public institutions are challenged by rightwing parties, and public funding for diversity and outreach programmes is cut?

By exploring the outlined topics, I seek to discuss how to redefine audiences and other stakeholders as citizens, reshape the role of arts organizations, and reconsider organisational infrastructure, managerial practice and programming. How could we rethink museums as public, politically participative spaces?

 


 

Portrait Birgit MandelBirgit Mandel
Prof. Dr. habil Birgit Mandel is head of MA program Arts Mediation and Cultural Management at the Department for Cultural Policy, University of Hildesheim.

She is Vice president of the German Society for Cultural Policy (Kulturpolitische Gesellschaft), founding member and former president of the Association of Cultural Management at universities in Germany, Austria and Switzerland (Fachverband für Kulturmanagement in Forschung und Lehre), board member for the Berlin Festival Management board (Kulturprojekte GmbH) board member of the Commerzbank Foundation Frankfurt a. M.

Her main research fields are cultural management in relation to cultural policy; audience development, visitor and non-visitor studies, marketing and public relations for the arts, cultural entrepreneurship and cultural tourism. She is author of various publications on arts/cultural management and mediation.

Abstract: together with Charlotte Burghardt
Migration as main trigger for change management in German public theatres? Results of a research project on the institutional crisis of public theatres?


German public theatres are under pressure to prove their relevance due to current discourses on challenged and chances of diversity and the role of arts institutions in an increasingly diverse society. How far is the diversity of the German population reflected in the audience, the programs and the staff of public theatres? Visitor surveys show that the audiences still consist of a small group with mainly higher education and German or Western European background. An analysis of the programs of drama theatres in Germany shows that the repertoire is dominated by canon of Western authors and directors.
Results of an analysis of the Maxim Gorki theatre in Berlin, the first public German theatre with an explicit mission for diversity, indicate that a policy to promote diversity in programming and staff influences the composition of the audience as well as organizational changes.

 


 

Portrait Adelheid MersAdelheid Mers
School of the Art Institute of Chicago, USA
Associate Professor, Cultural Management

Visual Artist, Performative Diagrammatics

Adelheid Mers is a visual artist who has developed and works through Performative Diagrammatics, a practice that includes elements of notation, consultation, carnivalesque, installation, and video. Her research draws on close work with others, exploring cultural ecologies at multiple scales. Educated at the University of Cologne, University Düsseldorf, Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and the University of Chicago, she is Associate Professor and previous chair of the department of Arts Administration and Policy at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Currently on sabbatical, she was a Visiting Lecturer at the Bauhaus University Weimar, in the Media Environments Department (2018), and teaches on-line for the Leuphana University Lüneburg Professional School/Goethe Institut MACUMA program (2018/19); is co-lead, with Doris Ingrisch, of an Art-Research Pilot project at mdw; and works towards an exhibition in Berlin, at Kunstverein Tiergarten Nord in March/April 2019.

Abstract:
togehter with Hanne Pilgrim
Workshop: For an Art of Emigration: ‘Many Figures Make A Ground’

Culture shock happens when a traveler returns home. To make the familiar seem strange is part of the role of art. What this workshop can do is to make familiar ways of thinking strange, by drawing on embodied knowledge. An art of emigration considers the value of de-familiarization to audiences, and ultimately to communication among co-located, but disparate constituencies. The workshop “Many Figures Form a Ground’ takes participants through a process of transpositions that mimic artistic processes of making things strange, through multimodal experimentation.
A team of facilitators, including Adelheid Mers, Hanne Pilgrim (mdw), and Sarah Hermanutz (BUW) will lead a 45-minute narrative and performative sequence that opens with a brief introduction, operates through facilitator prompts and mutual counsel among participants, and culminates in a simultaneous performance by all participants. The game sequence is to be followed by discussion and joint assessment of the experience, along with a theoretic contextualization that will elucidate diagrammatic concepts at work.

 


 

Portrait Robert PeperRobert Peper
Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hamburg, Deutschland
Postdoktorand und Netzwerkforscher

Dr. Robert Peper is a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Cultural and Media Management. He is a cultural sociologist who is specialized in network theory. He finished his PhD at Leuphana University of Lueneburg in 2015. He conducted network analysis in many German cities as a freelance researcher.

Abstract: together with Volker Kirchberg

Power and Potential of Artistic and Cultural Organizations in a Sustainable Urban Development – a Network Analysis

Our paper presents the results of a network study on sustainable urban development with a special focus on the importance of local artistic and cultural initiatives and organizations. This study was conducted in the framework of the interdisciplinary research "City as Possibility Space", which took place from 2015 to 2018. From a network theoretical perspective, we postulated that artistic and cultural actors participate strongly in this network and influence the strength and orientation of the network.
Our premise is that networking is an important factor of a powerful sustainable urban development. First, we therefore examine whether this sustainable urban development is a result of relational structures. Second, we can identify individual agents or organizations as key players in such a network. Third, we can find out how significant networks are for the actors by analyzing the benefits of network participation between control (power) and identity (community). It is here that the potentials of quantitative and qualitative network analysis can be combined to better understand the benefits of networking.
The data for the quantitative network analysis was collected in 2017 by means of a standardized online survey among organizations and projects of sustainable urban development in Hanover. Actors became co-operating partners according to their relationship. Relations were further differentiated according to symmetric and asymmetric relations. In addition, the centrality of the actors in the network was surveyed and the existence of subnetworks was recorded. Basically, it can be stated that municipal administrative offices hold the most important positions in the network. The actors are more interconnected if they are bureaucratically institutionalized, and they are less well networked if they work flexibly as temporary projects and initiatives. While municipal institutions can have a controlling effect here, artistic-cultural organizations in particular relied on help from other actors in the network.

The quantitative network analysis of 156 (large network) and 56 (core and intensive network) actors of sustainable urban development in Hannover has produced a number of results, which were presented for discussion at a workshop with field actors in Hanover, many of them from brokerage organizations. An important topic of the discussion at the workshop was the importance of institutionalizing organizations and sustainable urban development projects. One group of the participating actors demanded more institutionalization and a mimesis with the conventions of urban bureaucracy because the power of non-institutionalized organizations of sustainable urban development rely on a secured access to the bureaucratic headquarters of the urban municipality. The argument of this group was the relatively weak position of most initiatives and organizations that do not have comprehensive institutional structures in the illustrated network. They display mostly outgoing relationships (high outdegree values), so they ask for resources from others. The highly or higher institutionalized organizations, on the other hand, have many in-depth relationships (high indegree values), so they are asked by others for resources. This imbalance can only be reduced by a stronger institutionalization of the civil society actors, which is, however, not easy to be realized. Our network analysis data show that voluntary and unpaid employment is less helpful for networking actors than institutions that work with paid employees. This is not only valid for the municipal government agencies, but also for educational institutions, businesses, and (high) cultural venues, which have significantly higher levels of indegree as the voluntarily working initiatives, be they NGOs, grassroots initiatives or arts and cultural initiatives.

The other group protested against this demand for permanently institutionalized structures within the network, having their own strong arguments. Firstly, the possibility for a constructive cooperation in the community should not be based on mechanisms of top-down power (such as the dependency on financial resources), cf. Giuffre (2013), Sennett (2012) or Blokland (2017). Exploitation by some powerful brokers in the network can be prevented if all participants in the network have a solid and yet informal culture, with clear rules and moral values of a common solidarity (Giuffre 2013). This code of the "public conduct" (Blokland 2017), of "polity conventions" (Sennett 1998) or of "identity" (White 2012) prevents the misuse of a network. In addition, some institutional actors can contribute to enhancing the efficiency and flexibility of networking, especially if autonomy matches creativity. A code of "public conduct" consists of the exchange of knowledge, solidarity, unifying support, a capacity for open negotiation, attentive listening, dialogue and a sustainable continuity of cooperation among the network actors.  Then, the network cannot be used for the preservation of established top-down power but for the bottom-up and participatory development of creativity and innovation for a multidimensional sustainable urban development. A precondition for the success of this power distributing and power balancing networking is the fully accepted rule that the public completely subordinates to this “public conduct"; a deviation from this would result in sanctions, in the extreme a removal from the network.

This controversy about the necessity or the avoidance of institutionalization between the two groups can be classified into the dichotomous categories of structural or agency-oriented interpretations of the network. This issue can also be discussed with a view on the 17 global UN goals for sustainable development. For example, the 10th goal of the UN Sustainable Development Goals is "reducing inequality," with subgoals such as empowerment and social, economic, and political inclusion, and the 16th goal is "peaceful and inclusive societies," with the sub-goal of need-based, inclusive , participatory and representative decision-making. While a structuralist perspective on strengthening a sustainable urban development network may be appropriate to the current social reality, most of the actors in the network prefer to have a collaborative-interactional perspective in line with these goals of sustainable development. The discussion among the workshop participants is reflected in the results of our quantitative network analysis since one can also speak of a structural or an agency oriented evaluation of the network results. On the one hand (structuralistic interpretation), dominance as a power monopoly is viewed critically, since a dependence on interface actors could be exploited. But for others (interactionist interpretation), the power of some actors in the network is seen as reversible, because, on the basis of Harrison White's concept of communal identity, a monopolistic exercise of power can be prevented by jointly agreed rules and values. Here, in particular, artistic-cultural organizations in the network are expected to convey a "public conduct" (Blokland) or "policy conventions" (Sennett) in the sense of an egalitarian network.

 


 

Martin Piber
University of Innsbruck, Department of Organisation & Learning, Austria

Martin is professor at the Department of Organization and Learning at the University of Innsbruck/Austria. He is and has been teaching in several BA-, MA-, PhD-, MBA, and further education programs in Austria, Germany, Italy, South Africa, Spain, and Sweden. His research and his publications focus on strategizing and the management of cultural organizations, the practices and theory of management control and performance measurement, the relevance of culture for society, aesthetics, and business ethics. Since 2009 he was visiting professor at the University of Cape Town/ZA, the University of Pavia/I, and the University of Stockholm/S. Since 2012 Martin is scientific director of the Executive MBA program of Innsbruck University and the Center of Science and Training in Bregenz/Austria. His background includes strategy and change projects for several private and public organizations – especially in the fields of culture and the arts.

Abstract: together with Michael Habersam
The Evaluation of European Capitals of Culture: A Critical View on Evaluation Regimes, Citizenship and some Prolegomena to Future Evaluation Frameworks

This paper gives an extensive review of the past development and possible future directions of the evaluation framework for ECoC projects. An analysis of the methodological and epistemological assumptions of goal-setting processes, performance measurement instruments, and evaluation procedures sheds light on the influence of evaluative practices on the implementation of ECOC-projects. We also pose the question, how long-term-effects can be addressed and evaluated adequately. In terms of further developments, we will especially analyse to what extent the obligation for all ECoCs to evaluate themselves supports diversity, and if a systematic use of visualizations and narratives can contribute and complement or even partly replace existing evaluative frameworks. The results will allow to estimate to what extent evaluative action can assess success, what evaluation and monitoring frameworks contribute to what evaluation targets and what conclusions we can draw for future ECoC projects.

 


 

Portrait Hanne PilgrimHanne Pilgrim
mdw Wien, Österreich

Hanne Pilgrim is a rhythmician (a transdisciplinary method of approaching music & movement), pianist and performer which is currently based in Vienna, leading the department of Music & Movement/Rythmics at the University of Music and Performing Arts (since Oktober 2017). After her studies of Rythmics and Piano at the University of the Arts in Berlin and several further educations in contemporary dance Hanne Pilgrim worked in different artistic fields. As a pianist she focused on chambermusic, theatremusic and experimental band projects; as a performer she worked in the field of contemporary dance and contemporary music theatre. Hanne Pilgrim was a lecturer for piano improvisation, rhythmics and performance studies at the Berlin University of the Arts and the Franz Liszt Hochschule in Weimar and has givenworkshops in Europe and Asia.


Workshop: Together with Adelheid Mers
For an Art of Emigration: ‘Many Figures Make A Ground’

 


 

Portrait Julia K. PoscharnigJulia Poscharnig
University of Applied Arts, Vienna
Montessori ORG Grödig/Salzburg, Austria


Julia K. Poscharnig studied Art Education at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. Since 2012 she has been involved in art education. Since 2015 she has been teaching at the Institute of Art Science & Education. Her research focuses on a possible hybrid identity of educators, and on the question of what art-education students need and expect from contemporary didactics in order to develop a professional identity through an epistemological break. She is currently working on her doctoral thesis at the University of Applied Arts Vienna.

Abstract: together with Pamela Bartar
Re-modeling impulses for social inclusion in artistic research: A workshop

Values of “the arts” are diverse and invariably grounded in social experience. Value-for-Society is a frequent discussed term in the academic research and contemporary art. The social per se attracts interest from funders, academics and artists who want to use their creative skills for the benefit of communities and to address social, economic or political issues. The workshop aims on the one hand to discuss the potentials, limits and possible outputs of artistic research demonstrating the value of sensual engagements within learning and on the other hand requests artistic responsibility and social accountability within artistic citizenship. By hypothesizing and re-framing the research and education project “Textiles as a Social Fabric” (by researcher Ruth Mateus-Berr 2015) a discussion forum will be opened up to take steps towards a theoretical framework of socially engaged artistic research and design and good practice models. After a short introduction on the project, methodology and findings, the workshop will invite participants to further track questions “behind” disciplinary borders; they will be invited to contribute to a critical snapshot corresponding to the opening question of democratic pedagogy in the arts. The workshop combines the text-based World Café concept with other tactile and visual elements, including a sensual approach producing complementary codes instead of a monolingual approach in education. The workshop is designed as an interactive process and work in progress therefore the output of the workshop will be collected and then provided online (https://epilogueonsocialvalue.wordpress.com) for further discussion in the community to ensure enhancements through discussion. The website already provides material - recording and discussion - from our workshop in May 2018 (conference: Teaching artistic research, Vienna) on which the present workshop is based. The website is an integral part of the workshop. It is designed as a platform to collect, exchange, discuss and evaluate issues and further questions that are being raised during the workshop.

 


 

Portrait Anke SchadAnke Schad
Researcher, facilitator, Austria

Anke Schad completed her PhD in Cultural Management at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna with distinction in 2017. The Austrian Ministry of Science and Research awarded her PhD-thesis on Urban Cultural Governance with the Award of Excellence. She works as an independent scholar, evaluator and facilitator in the areas of cultural policy and management, international cultural cooperation, and cultural education and learning. Since 2017, she accompanies the Goethe-Institut under a framework contract in various international collaboration projects in the areas of urban cultural development, European cultural politics and creative industries. Since 2016, Anke Schad is a member of the board of the Association of Cultural Management.

Abstract:

Who decides? Arts, citizenship and diversity of expressions between normative claims and real political problems

The presentation examines decision-making processes on funding for the arts and culture in Austria. Despite intentions to depoliticize decision-making in institutions owned by public authorities according to economic governance principles (Bundeskanzleramt Österreich 2012) in the course of privatization (Tschmuck 2008), interest-driven interventions of political representatives have not decreased. Apart from the general budgeting decisions, this applies specifically when it comes the selection of leadership positions (Wimmer 2011; Schad 2019) and the selection of jury and advisory bodies (Schad 2019). The power position of political representatives (who are largely homogeneous, there are for example more mayors called Josef than female mayors) coincides with a range of discriminatory factors, such a legal framework excluding a growing proportion of the Austrian population from representative political processes due to their foreign citizenship.
The consequence: asymmetrical power structures and intersectional discrimination thwart the normative demand to strive towards a diversity of cultural expressions on all levels. Yet, civil society actors find ways to voice theirs concerns, most notably through social media campaigns. The presentation briefly outlines the general cultural policy structure in Austria and obstacles as well as opportunities to facilitate a broader participation in decision-making. Cases of decision-making for arts and cultural budgeting on the local and provincial level in Austria are examined based on data generated through interviews with politicians, administrators and cultural professionals as well as policy documents and digital media sources. The analytical approach combines Boltanski and Thévenot’s typology of Orders of Worth (Boltanski and Thévenot 2006) as a framework to analyse argumentation and justification with Clarke’s Situational Analysis  (Clarke 2005) as a framework to analyse power relationships between actors and other elements. Who decides about funding for the arts and culture? Who uses what kind of arguments? Who is excluded of the decision-making arena, whose voices remain unheard (Spivak 2003) and for what reasons? What kind of strategies do civil society actors use to voice their concerns? On the normative level, the examination of these questions is fundamental to a diversity of cultural expressions as an indicator for democratic quality (Council of Europe 2016).

 


 

Portrait Gabriele SchorGabriele Schor
Gründungsdirektorin der SAMMLUNG VERBUND, Wien

Dr. Gabriele Schor studierte Philosophie und Kunstgeschichte in Wien und San Diego (USA). Sie arbeitete in der Tate Gallery in London, war Kunst-Korrespondentin für die Neue Zürcher Zeitung und lehrte an Universitäten moderne Kunst sowie Theorie und Praxis der Kunstkritik.
Seit 2004 leitet sie die SAMMLUNG VERBUND, die sie von Beginn an mit zwei Schwerpunkten aufgebaut hat: die Wahrnehmung von Räumen und Orten sowie feministischen Kunst der 1970er-Jahre.
Schor prägte den Begriff ‚Feministische Avant-Garde’ und brachte ihn in den kunsthistorischen Diskurs ein, um die Pionierleistung dieser Künstlerinnen hervorzuheben. Zahlreiche Publikationen: u.a. 2009 mit Abigail Solomon-Godeau die erste Birgit Jürgenssen-Monografie, 2012 Catalogue Raisonné zum Frühwerk von Cindy Sherman, 2014 mit Elisabeth Bronfen den ersten deutschsprachigen Katalog zu Francesca Woodman, 2015 Kompendium zur Feministischen Avantgarde, 2016 mit Jessica Morgan erste Monografie zu Renate Bertlmann, 2018 Katalog zu Louise Lawler.


Dr. Gabriele Schor studied philosophy and art history in Vienna and San Diego (USA). She worked at the Tate Gallery in London, was Art Correspondent for the Neue Zürcher Zeitung and taught modern art as well as the theory and practice of art criticism at universities.
Since 2004 she has directed the SAMMLUNG VERBUND Collection, Vienna, which she has built up from the beginning with two main focuses: the perception of spaces and places as well as feminist art of the 1970s.
Schor coined the term 'Feminist Avant-Garde' and established it to the art-historical discourse in order to highlight the pioneering role of these artists. Numerous publications: i.a. 2009 with Abigail Solomon-Godeau the first Birgit Jürgenssen monograph, 2012 Catalog Raisonné on the early works of Cindy Sherman, 2014 with Elisabeth Bronfen catalog on Francesca Woodman, 2015 compendium on the Feminist Avantgarde, 2016 with Jessica Morgan first monograph on Renate Bertlmann, 2018 catalog on Louise Lawler.

Foto: © Katharina Gossow


 

Portrait Christian SteinmayrChristian Steinmayr
CEO Steinmayr & Co Insurance Brokers


Christian was born and raised in Innsbruck as the son of cyclist and business man Wolfgang Steinmayr.  The familiy owned business Steinmayr & Partner (sold in 2000) formed his entrepreneurial spirit. After attaining a law degree in 2004, Christian moved to London and Zürich to aquire deepened knowledge of the insurance market and in 2007 moved to Fuschl am See to head Red Bull’s international insurance department. After 4 years with Red Bull Christian returned to Innsbruck to found Steinmayr & Insurance Brokers – today one of Austria‘s largest corporate insurance brokers. Being a lover of art and culture, Christian used cultural sponsorship as a marketing tool from day one. Steinmayr & Co invests 5% of the company's turnover on marketing, mainly to support art & charities. Steinmayr & Co is also the main sponsor of the Dance Company of the Tiroler Landestheater Innsbruck – one of Europes finest dancing ensembles.Christian is married to Cuban dancer Julia Rojas Posada and father of two sons.






 


 

Portrait Lisa StuckeyLisa Stuckey
Institute for Art Theory and Cultural Studies

Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Austria

Lisa Stuckey is a doctoral candidate at the Institute for Art Theory and Cultural Studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. In her research project, she examines investigative aesthetics between art and jurisdiction in the work of Forensic Architecture.

Stuckey studied Art & Communication and Art & Media at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna and the Royal Institute of Art Stockholm. She works as an independent curator and guest lecturer. Curatorial Projects: Prisoners of Venus. A Video Exhibition (Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, 2016), Posthuman Complicities (xhibit, 2017), I hear the waters’ song (mumok cinema, 2017), and Nor Heat Nor Gloom Of Night (Tiger Strikes Asteroid Los Angeles, 2018). Guest lectures: Brut Künstlerhaus, Volksbühne Berlin, Institute for Art Theory and Cultural Studies, and Literaturhaus Wien.
Currently she is Junior Fellow at IFK International Research Center for Cultural Studies in Vienna.

Abstract:

ARTIST-AS-DETECTIVE

Based on the term “artist-as-ethnographer,” that Hal Foster coined in 1995, this paper proposes the “artist-as-detective”. These figures share common ground regarding institutional critique and new areas of inquiry imported to the museum. However, the latter shifts its attention to the use of media in courts and tribunals­, noticeable especially when it comes to the agency “Forensic Architecture”. Based on the discourse initiated by Eyal Weizman, who founded the agency to disclose current political and ecological crimes, the presentation focuses on its (artistic) habitus. This is to challenge the claim of art being merely a platform such as the appropriation of ‘aesthetics’ as an investigative method.
Is the figure of the “artist-as-detective” suitable to grasp this contemporary phenomenon, or is it just an offer of proxy? Using civil disobedience both as a means of protest and to generate counter-information, the format of a cosmopolitical engaged ‘case’—which can be ordered by civil society—implies: critique has become a service
.

 


 

Martin Tröndle
WÜRTH Chair of Cultural Production
Zeppelin Universität

Since 2015 Martin Tröndle is appointed to the WÜRTH Chair of Cultural Production at the Department of Culture and Media Science at theZeppelin University in Germany. The work at the Chair deals with a large variety of topics, all centred around the production, distribution and reception of arts.
Tröndle was principal investigator (2008-14) of eMotion – mapping museum experience, supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation.eMotion analysed the experience of the museum-goer experimentally. (www.mapping-museum-experience.com)

Tröndle is now principal investigator (since 2018) of ECR – Experimental Concert Research supported by the Volkswagen Foundation and others. ECR is experimentally analysing the concert experience.
Since 2014 Tröndle is Editor in Chief (with Steffen Höhne) of the peer reviewed journal Zeitschrift für Kulturmanagement: Kunst, Politik, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft / Journal of Cultural Management: Arts, Policy, Economics, and Society.
He is the Editor of the two volumes Das Konzert: Neue Aufführungskonzepte für eine klassische Form (2011, 2nd edition) und Das Konzert II: Beiträge zum Forschungsfeld der Concert Studies (2018) as well as several other books.
His work gained attention by the media (e.g. print: The New York TimesDIE ZEITDer SpiegelEl Pais), German, Swiss, Austrian TV and Radio Stations and many others.

 


 

Portrait Karen van den BergKaren van den Berg
hair of Art Theory & Curating

Zeppelin Universität, Friedrichshafen, Germany
Chair of Art Theory & Curating

Karen van den Berg (born 1963) is professor for Art Theory and Curating at Zeppelin University (ZU). She studied Art History, Classical Archeology and Nordic Philology in Saarbrücken and Basel. Her PhD thesis on Matthias Grünewald received support through a stipend of the Friedrich-Naumann-Stiftung. Van den Berg also earned the ›Max Imdahl-Stipendium für Kunstvermittlung‹ between 1994 and 1996. Between 1993 and 2003 she has been a regular lecturer and research fellow at the chair for Art Studies and Aesthetics and co-founder of the “art in dialog” program at University Witten/Herdecke. Research stays and teaching brought her to numerous internationally acclaimed institutions including the Chinati Foundation in Marfa (Texas), Bauhaus University Weimar, Parsons New School for Design in New York City and to the Europäisches Kolleg Jena. She also served as visiting scholar at the Department of Comparative Literature at Stanford University and as a fellow at Internationales Kolleg für Kulturtechnikforschung und Medienphilosophie (IKKM) in Weimar. Her research focusses on art and politics, artistic episteme, art market studies and studio practice, theory and history of displaying, museums, and educational architecture.


Abstract:

Help! Help! - Artistic approaches in civil society refugee work

In October 2015, the director of the refugee organization RISE Tania Canas published a guideline for artists in order to protect traumatized refugees from being appropriated by reckless artists and their projects. Socially committed art forms, which were a rather marginalized genre before 2015, suddenly became surprisingly popular in the wake of the major migration movements in Europe. Art foundations and state governments established funding lines exclusively for socially integrative art projects.
The lecture presents prominent examples of artistically inspired projects with refugees and attempts to work out the objectives and approaches with which these projects operated. In doing so, it also asks which criteria - in addition to the RISE guidelines - could help evaluate these projects.

 


 

Portrait Gudrun WallenböckGudrun Wallenböck
MdW, EUNEPA, hinterland, Austria
Intercultural Arts Management, Focus Middle East

Gudrun Wallenböck is the founder and artistic director of hinterland galerie, founder of hinterland design and co founder of sitios – a global network on urban solutions for public space. hinterland galerie is an independent art space and platform dedicated to the promotion of intercultural and interdisciplinary projects. Since its inception hinterland has remained committed to supporting the work of emerging and established artists from the Middle East and in particular artists living and working in Iran. Gudrun has been part of the program team for two European Capitals of Culture. Since 2009 she is working as a curator and arts manager for international and intercultural projects. She is a senior consultant at EUNEPA. She holds a Master´s degree in Architecture, a Master´s degree in cultural management and she is now working on her PHD on “Challenges of intercultural Curation, mainly between the Middle East and Europe”. She is also part of the advisory board of the SIMORGH Foundation based in Vienna.
www.hinterland.ag  www.sitios-global.net  www.thesimorgh.org www.eunepa.com


Abstract:
Curators as peace workers?
The challenges of intercultural curation of contemporary art in the non-profit cultural sector, taking Austria and Iran as an example


What can art exhibitions achieve across cultures? What role does the curator play in light of bridge-building and working against (cultural) prejudices amidst the social-political concerns of the present world paradigm? The challenges for curators of contemporary art who mediate and work between different cultures and countries is the main issue of this talk.
I will discuss and try to examine these strategies for intercultural curation and arts management. Through the aesthetics of artworks, and the relevant discussions that these can generate, we can learn much about people and their culture that paves the way for understanding. It is the curator´s mission to display and communicate the artists´ works to the world. With our work as a curator we need to create awareness and build bridges for better mutual understanding. Key questions addressed by this paper include examining the why of intercultural curatorial practice, and how such practice may function
.

 


 

Portrait Aleysia K. WhitmoreAleysia K. Whitmore
Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of Denver, USA

EURIAS Research Fellow, IMéRA, Aix-Marseille Université, FRANCE

Aleysia K. Whitmore is an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Lamont School of Music, University of Denver and a EURIAS Research Fellow at IMéRA, Aix-Marseille Université. Her research focuses on the world music industry, globalization, and cultural policy. Her current book project shows how musicians, industry actors, and audiences create, promote, and consume West African and Cuban musics in the world music industry. Other research projects examine how cultural policies engage with diverse music practices in the southeast of France. She has published articles in Ethnomusicology and MusiCultures. She has taught popular music, world music, and classical music courses at Brown University, Boston College, the University of Miami, and the University of Colorado Denver. She holds a BMus from the University of Toronto (Canada) and AM and PhD degrees in ethnomusicology from Brown University (USA).


Abstract:

France has historically promoted Western musics’ roles in furthering national values. What happens when the government begins supporting world musics? How do policy makers frame these musics’ value to the nation—especially in the context of increasing tensions surrounding immigration and racism? This paper shows how music and policy professionals promote world musics by combining existing discourses about musics’ value to the nation with emerging ideas about cultural diversity. These professionals (e.g., concert organizers, government employees) feel that world music projects should promote French national values and identity and foster cultural pride in the diverse communities they serve—work often seen as threatening French egalitarianism by promoting one community over others (communitarisme). Drawing on ethnographic research in France in 2017 and 2018, I show how music and policy professionals negotiate these tensions as they reframe musics’ value in an increasingly diverse nation.

 


 

Portrait Karin WolfKarin Wolf
Director of the Institut für Kulturkonzepte, Vienna

Founder and director of the Institut für Kulturkonzepte, Vienna. She studied Theatre, Film and Media Studies as well as History of Art (Vienna, etc). Additionally, she completed the European Diploma in Cultural Project Management. Since 1999, she has been giving lectures on the subject of cultural management at the Vienna University, Danube University Krems, University of Arts Graz, University of Graz and University of Belgrade. Furthermore, she directed the university course Kultur & Organisation (Culture and Organisation) at the Vienna University. Her personal focus lies on: personal development in the cultural establishments, team development and managers training, job coaching and career management as well as presentation training.

Abstract:
Cultural management at the interface of city development and cultural mediation  

In Vienna, many recent city development projects (Seestadt Aspern, Nordbahnhof, Sonnwendviertel) engage with the current and the future questions about how to live together. These areas attract innovative living projects and social initiatives, which are encouraged to discuss current socio-political issues, work out answers as well as to try out the models. Cultural institutions increasingly use this dynamic, as in the newly evolving field of Outreach and Audience Development. During the training for future cultural managers, it will be ever more important to convey competences at performing at the interface. In the same way, the future cultural managers should focus on the devotion to the field of social action, in which much innovation is demanded. The question of the future social cooperation is a pivotal one, as it is based on various disciplines reaching from sociology, architecture and theory of organisation to city politics. Therefore, the students of these disciplines should already during their studies design joint concepts and projects, which could be later integrated into the city development. 

 


 

Portrait Edith Wolf PerezEdith Wolf Perez
www.tanz.at, mdw, Austria

Already during her dance education at the Laban Centre London, Edith Wolf Perez started to work in inclusive, participatory dance projects and has led community dance interventions in various settings in Germany and the UK.
After moving to Vienna, her work has taken a different direction: she became a journalist and in 1989 co-founded a dance magazine, followed by the online magazine www.tanz.at that she continues editing. She also writes for national and international trade magazines and newspapers. She is a speaker at international professional conferences.

She is holding an M.A. in European Cultural Policy from the University of Warwick, has co- authored an international report about cultural policies in 42 European countries, and, in the last 15 years, has co-managed European projects in the area of arts and education.
Edith is currently undertaking a PhD candidate at the Faculty of Music Sociology at the University of Music Vienna. The title of her thesis is: “Migrancy as a Narrative of Contemporary Dance”.

Abstract:

Community Dance Performance – A Strong Case for the Arts?

“Community Dance” refers to a particular dance practice, choreography and/or training, with amateur dancers often leading to a theatre performance. Research based evidence suggests that this practice empowers participants towards self-determination thus promoting active citizenship.
While an increasing number of community projects take place, “mainstream” choreographers are distancing themselves from the notion of community dance, even if they are working with non-professional dancers. Why? Are community dance performances per se artistically less valid? Is it a lesser art, if social, educational, or health issues come into play in the artistic creation? Or do they rank higher than artistic merits? Following the argument of Raymond Williams, is community dance performance a way of moving contemporary dance from the tight context of “art” to the inclusive notion of “culture”?

The negotiation of the above questions will be illustrated with examples from the practice of dance performances with non-professional dancers in diverse contexts.

 


 

Portrait Martin ZieroldMartin Zierold
Institute for Arts and Media Management

Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hamburg, Germany

Martin Zierold holds the Zajadacz Foundation Professorship for Innovation and Digital Transformation at the Institute for Arts and Media Management at Hamburg’s University of Theatre and Music. His areas of focus are cultural leadership and organisational development. Martin studied Media Studies, Cultural Studies and Management at Münster University, where he also obtained his PhD with a thesis on the transformation of memory culture in the wake of contemporary digital media. Martin worked as a press spokesman and head of media relations for Tonkunstler Orchestra and the International Music Festival Grafenegg (Austria). Also, he spent seven years as Academic Manager and Principal Investigator of the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture at Gießen University and three years as a professor for Arts Management and Cultural Studies in Karlsruhe. An overview of publications and further activities can be found online at www.martinzierold.de Contact: mail@martinzierold.de

Abstract:
Peer to Peer Workshop on Higher Education Teaching:
Creating Learning Spaces to foster “Haltung” as a “Reflective Practitioner Mindset”

The shift from teaching to learning and from teaching knowledge content to helping students to develop their skills and competences is key to the Bologna process and has gradually become the norm in many arts management curricula. However, what if even skills and competences are no longer enough?Under conditions of constant transformation and uncertainty and in the light of more diverse societies and arts organizations, focusing on competences and skills in curriculum design can also reach its limits. What is needed might be something that in German is called “Haltung”: a combination of explicit cognitive aspects (like an ethical orientation grounded in norms and values as well as heuristics or rules of thumb for dealing with complexity) as well as implicit embodied knowledge (i.e. intuition). The term “mindset” might be the closest English translation for “Haltung” even though it does not exactly seem to match the complexities of the German term.If indeed students and practitioners of arts management will need “Haltung” more than anything in present and future times of fundamental social and cultural tensions and transformation, it should be key for curricula (in Higher Education as well as professional training) to put a strong emphasis on designing learning spaces that foster the development of “Haltung”, possibly leading towards a “Reflective Practitioner Mindset”.In this peer-to-peer workshop, we will have the opportunity to first discuss the argument sketched out above, as well as exchange existing experiences, and possibly co-design prototypes of teaching formats.